Roadtrip from San Pedro de Atacama to Salta

By Emma. For the slideshow, click here.

Inescapable slasher films, wonderful pleather recliners, overflowing toilets and disturbingly damp aisles, fleece blanket tuck-ins, Argentinian Irish stew, desert breakdowns and mildly worrying careening, infinite highways and pocked dirt tracks – all part of the intrigue and vagaries of bus travel in South America. Honestly, and pretty inexplicably, I have really been enjoying the marathon trips, the ups and downs. These bus journeys seem, to me, to be the complete opposite of the sterile, identikit environments of airports. Traveling (relatively) slowly like this feels more like a process than just a result – it feels, somehow, more real.

Bus breakdown near Puerto Madryn, Argentina

Bus breakdown near Puerto Madryn, Argentina

It probably comes across as a bit bizarre to rhapsodize about a bus journey but here I go. The 10-hour journey from San Pedro de Atacama, Chile, across the Andes to Salta, Argentina, winds through some truly incredible scenery and spins along some of the most dangerous roads in the world (http://www.dangerousroads.org/). Setting out from San Pedro de Atacama we head east, the road flanking the spectacular and perfectly conical Volcan Licancabur.

DSCF5636

We climb higher and higher to 4000m. Weather-sculpted red earth, snow capped volcanoes, aquamarine and navy lagoons flecked with pink flamingos and vast expanses of breathtaking nothingness streak by. “Wolverine” is playing as the in-bus entertainment but Damien and I have our noses firmly pressed against the glass of the window, determined not to miss a thing in this Martian landscape!

DSCF5648

We cross the plateau and begin another climb. The bus struggles. We reach 4,500m and another plateau of beaded, salt-edged lagoons. The landscape slides slowly past in shades of red, pink, ochre, yellow and brown. Jagged spears of ice stand out against the scorched earth.

Ice shards

Ice shards

The tingling in our fingertips increases and it becomes a little difficult to catch our breath. We continue to climb. The bus struggles, struggles and cuts out. The lower level of oxygen is affecting the engine’s combustion. We stop for 20 minutes and then continue our slow climb. The engine cuts out again. We stare out of our window. Clouds drift across the road in front of us at approx 5,000m.

Cuesta del Lipán: drop from 4200 to 2200m

Cuesta del Lipán: drop from 4200 to 2200m

We clear the highest point at a snail’s pace and emerge from the clouds. The descent begins and the road twists and coils below us. It is impossible to cleave our attention away from the drama of the Cuesta del Lipán’s hairpin bends and sheer roadside drops.

DSCF5713

Down and down we corkscrew past fields of reaching green cacti and rippling mountains. The landscape changes again as we reach the adobe village of Purmamarca at the foot of the La Cuesta de Lipan. The mountains tower above and around us in incredible colours of greens, reds and purples. This is the Quebrada de Purmamarca and the Cerro de los Siete Colores ( Hill of Seven Colors). It’s incredible!

DSCF5749

As we continue onwards, the landscape becomes more and more green and it’s increasingly easier to breath. The difference with the stark and beautiful desolation of Atacama is at once striking and refreshing. Yet, as we pull into Salta, I know we’re both disappointed this amazing bus journey is over.

Advertisements

San Pedro de Atacama

By Emma. Cliquez ici pour l’article de Damien. Click here for photos of there.

A remote desert oasis of sun-baked adobe, vicuñas, cracked red earth and unexpected lagoons, blue-lips and short breath,forgotten languages, cacti, resourceful toads, pervasive dust, sand, salt, arsenic and life

“In the desert no one remembers your name…”

The small town of San Pedro de Atacama perches at an altitude of 2,400m on the edge of the driest desert in the world. Its streets are a jumble of squat, thatched adobe buildings baking in the sun. Squinting, sweating and clutching a tiny map and the name of a hostel, we pile on our rucksacks and set out from the bus station in search of a temporary home. Immediately, a slight problem arises – the streets have no apparent names and the intense midday sun means that there isn’t a soul to be seen. We wander about making increasingly desperate attempts at interpreting the map – oh Lonely Planet but that’s not where the bus station is! Finally, we spot somebody coming out from under her unhinged front door of corrugated tin. Somehow, she has no notion of the name of the street where she lives – apparently it has no name – but she happily points us in the direction of the town centre. Saved! Past a beautiful white-washed church and a grove of pink peppercorn trees in the town square, we discover our wonderfully Tatooine-esque hostel and start plotting our stay in our first ever desert!

Baked earth in the Atacama desert

Baked earth in the Atacama desert

A wonder-filled geographical collage

Unfortunately, the only way to truly access the desert plains, volcanoes, geysers, lagoons and salt fields of Atacama is by tour company. Crammed into a bus and herded out, on a rigid schedule, among the wonders is, for me, a sure-fire way of rendering an incredible adventure … beige! Despite my initial inner railing, the otherworldly landscapes of the Atacama leave me breathless.

The Salar de Atacama

We wander through the jagged, cracked surface of the salt flats in the Salar de Atacama. The pungent odour of sulphur hangs heavy in the air. Patches of scrubby vegetation cling tenaciously to life here in the sparce, arcenic-laced soil and yet, it is here, at the edges of the shallow, stagnant pools, that Chilean, Andean and James flamingos have chosen to feed, congregate and mate. Their pinks and blacks are clash vibrantly against the desolate backdrop.

Salar de Atacama

Salar de Atacama

Andean Flamingos

Andean Flamingos

Lagunas Miscanti, Miñiques & Tuyajto

We pile back into our minibus and climb our way up to an altitude of 4,200m. Our lips have taken on a curious blue-ish tinge and our fingertips are tingling – common side-effects of the lower levels of oxygen at this altitude. A strange numbness creeps over my cheek bones and I mentally spin through the symptoms of altitude sickness (a nurse and trainee doctor sharing stories at the dinner table at home seems to equate to a certain degree of osmosis/paranoia/scarring – you know who you are!) but I think we’re still good to go. Diamox is placed on stand-by none-the-less.

Wild, elegant vicuñas – a relation of the llama and guanaco – graze on the salt grass tufts at the edge of the heart-shaped Laguna Miscanti. Intense hunting for their meat and their prized wool decimated the vicuña population and they were declared endangered in 1974. A prohibition on hunting and trade in vicuña wool has enabled the species to begin to re-establish their numbers, growing from a critical 6,000 in the wild to a healthier 125,000 in Chile and Peru. They remain classified as vulnerable.

Vicuña

A vicuña in the wetlands within the Atacama desert

Lakes Miscanti and Miñiques lie side by side in the shadow of the towering Cerro Miscanti and Miñiques volcano. As part of an eco-etno-tourism movement, the indigenous Atacameño community is responsible for the lakes and the related administration. Miscanti means ‘toad’ in Atacameño and refers to a time when the lake was populated by toads. However, in the 1940s and 1950s, rainbow trout were introduced into the lake and wiped out the local toad population. I had no idea trout could do that! It was thought that the name remained only as a remnant of toadier times  but, according to our guide, these resourceful creatures have recently been rediscovered, having taken refuge from the invading trout in the area’s underground rivers. Good job, toads! The lakes also provide a habitat for the rare hornet coot which my newly bird-crazy boyfriend (I don’t know how this happened but the anorak is hovering!) sets about stalking. We also manage to spot a culpeo zorro or Andean fox (wolf) skulking in the grasses – happy days!

Park entry

Park entry

Laguna Miscanti

Laguna Miscanti

Again, we’re hustled into the minibus and we continue on to laguna Tuyajto, which really looks like it has been painted in watercolours. It’s hard to believe it’s real and harder to believe that these incredible lakes lie in the Atacama desert – the most arid desert in the world!

DSCF5211

Next on the itinerary is a visit to a wonderful pre-Incan church of cactus wood, mud and straw in a village which has somehow managed to thrive high up on the altiplano. Our guide points out the isolated, baked mud huts of the llama shepherdesses, the terraces cut into the steep slopes where quinoa and potatoes are cultivated and recounts how a program for the recovery of the lost local language of Kunsa is being led here. Currently, only shamans (who, in this culture, are women) have gained a mastery of it, having been taught its songs by the wilderness. It’s a tale that definitely catches my imagination!

Socaire

Socaire

El Tatio

Meaning “grandfather” or “old man crying” in Quechua, el Tatio is a spectacular geothermal field of bubbling, spitting, spurting and steaming geysers.

A geyser in El Tatio

A geyser in El Tatio

Interestingly, it also contains the highest natural concentrations of arsenic on Earth- hundreds of times higher than the World Health Organization’s “recommended maximum limit” of ten micrograms/litre – did we know this before hopping delightedly into its hot spring pool? Nope..hohum..

Mmm a long hot soak in some arsenic

Mmm a long hot soak in some arsenic

Valle de la Muerte & Valle de la Luna

A startlingly inhospitable place where the earth’s crust has buckled and rippled to form incredible rock formations, nothing grows and nothing lives in the Valle de la Muerte (Valley of Death). It is at once instinctively intimidating and alluring. It’s like nothing I’ve ever seen before, managing to be both dustily barren and absolutely beautiful. The sun beats down relentlessly as we wander among the twisted, contorted red rock and race down the enormous dunes, I know that this is the desert I have been imagining. Here, and for the first time, it becomes possible to believe that there are places in the Atacama desert that climatologists call “absolute desert”, places where rain has never been recorded.

Valle de la Muerte

Valle de la Muerte

DSCF5516

We drive on to the Valle de la Luna (Valley of the Moon) where fittingly the moon has risen and hangs above the valley’s jagged, salty outcrops. We can hear the salt mountains shift and crack in the heat. The landscape is satisfyingly lunar (they did promise!) and as the sun sets, the valley is lit up with hues of pinks and oranges which deepen to purple and black.

Sunset in Valle de la Luna

Sunset in Valle de la Luna

San Pedro de Atacama et son désert

Par Damien. Click here for Emma’s post. Et pour les photos c’est ici!

Après ce petit break citadin à Santiago/Valpo, on reprend la route avec un petit 24H de bus vers le nord du Chili, au coeur du désert d’Atacama, le plus aride du monde.

Cacti in Atacama

Cacti in Atacama

Orientation chaotique

Arrivé à destination, San Pedro de Atacama, la station de bus n’est pas la même que celle marquée sur notre plan, enfin ça on le comprendra plus tard, car en attendant on pense être de l’autre côté de la ville, et la route (chemin poussiéreux) qui selon nous mène vers le centre, nous conduit en fait au milieu de nulle part. Fatigués par les deux douzaines d’heures de bus, on ne pense même pas à juste demander la direction du centre, et on demande à un passant la direction vers la rue où on avait repéré une petite auberge bien réputée. Mais ici personne ne connait le nom des rues, alors qu’il y en a probablement qu’une dizaine. On demande à une autre dame qui sort de chez elle le nom de la rue actuelle, espérant se repérer sur notre plan, mais elle ne le connait pas. Elle ne sait donc pas où elle habite.

On finit par trouver notre adresse, murs en adobe et toit en paille, bambous et bois de cactus, comme toutes les maisons de la ville, et on peut enfin se reposer un peu avant de partir à l’aventure!

Bunkbeds and roof

Bunkbeds and roof

L’aventure!

Enfin l’aventure ici, ça consiste surtout à prendre un mini-bus avec une douzaine d’autres touristes (voire trentaine selon les compagnies), qui nous conduit à plus de 4200m par monts et vallées, avec de multiples “arrêts photos” pour immortaliser les panoramas et autres villages indigènes. On ne boude pas notre plaisir face au désert de sel du salar de Atacama, aux lagunas Miscanti, Miñiques, et surtout le magnifique laguna Tuyajto, mais on se rend vite compte que les tours en mini-bus avec des guides plus ou moins intéressants et un emploi du temps chronométré, c’est pas vraiment notre tasse de thé!

DSCF5099

Salar de Atacama

DSCF5211

Laguna Tuyajto

Mais on n’a pas vraiment le choix, les principaux centres d’intérêt sont à plusieurs heures de chemins parfois chaotiques, et si les VTT qui se louent à chaque coin de rue semblent une excellente alternative pour visiter les environs immédiats, rien n’est vraiment plat dans ce désert, et avec notre première expérience de l’altitude on est en permanence fatigué.

Geysers et paysages lunaires

On poursuit donc nos visites-mini-bus avec un départ très matinal pour admirer au lever du soleil les geysers d’El Tatio, à 4200m d’altitude. Impressionnante expérience sensorielle de voir, entendre et sentir (!) ces eaux bouillonnantes jaillir de terre!

DSCF5338
On finit même par y goûter, avec un petit bain dans une piscine naturelle, des courants parfois brulants et le fond de pierres chauffées par l’intense activité volcanique souterraine.

Bathing in arsenic laced hot springs!

Bathing in arsenic laced hot springs!

Dernière sortie, pas de mini-bus, mais un petit trek à travers les vallées aux abords de la ville, principales attractions de San Pedro: la vallée de la Mort et la vallée de la Lune.

DSCF5484

Las Tres Marias

Las Tres Marias

Des paysages donc lunaires (voire martiens) avec ces roches faites de sable et de sel, aux couleurs si chaudes, qu’on admire jusu’au coucher du soleil.

DSCF5584
Le dernier jour on se remet de nos émotions et on se repose à San Pedro, les photos typiques vous montreront des petites rues désertes, mais la réalité est beaucoup plus touristique, avec en haut du podium les Français qu’on entend à chaque coin de rue!

DSCF5614
On comprend sans mal le succès de cette destination qui a tant à offrir, et on se sent si bien dans ces paysages désertiques qu’on décide d’ajouter une petite boucle vers le côté argentin de la frontière, avant de poursuivre en Bolivie.

Valparaiso

By Emma. Cliquez ici pour l’article de Damien. Click here for photos of there.

Tangled streets and dead ends, a Lego-brick port and favela colour clusters, the smell of hops and the screech of seagulls, faded murals and uneasy graffiti, corrugated zinc and crumbling plaster, Neruda’s “dishevelled hills” and their shuddering, straining funiculars, wrong turns and the heeding of a local’s friendly warnings in a vaguely threatening urban labyrinth, a displaced Maoi and an echo of Easter Island, a bath of sunshine in Viña del Mar, a dinner invitation and travelling tales, a dim bar, acoustic guitar and a beautiful, broken voice, deceptively potent pisco sours and dancing ’til dawn

Streets of Valparaiso

Streets of Valparaiso

Un ascensor de Valparaiso

Un ascensor de Valparaiso

A colourful hilltop favela in Valparaiso

A colourful hilltop favela in Valparaiso

A Valpo pup

A Valpo pup

Valparaiso, en couleurs et en reliefs

Par Damien. Click here for Emma’s Valparaiso, et ici pour les photos.
On quitte la région des lacs en se disant qu’on y reviendra un jour pour la découvrir un peu plus… A vrai dire on se dit ça après quasiment chaque destination, à croire qu’on refera exactement le même voyage dans quelques années, en faisant juste les choix opposés lorsqu’on est passé à côté de quelque chose, par choix ou par contrainte.
Place maintenant au passage obligé par la capitale, quoiqu’en vrai c’est plutôt la ville portuaire juste à côté qui nous intéresse, l’ultra-colorées Valparaiso, ou plus affectueusement “Valpo”.

L’obscure tarification des bus

J’ai acheté des billets Pucón-Santiago, même si Emma me dit qu’il existe des lignes directes Pucón-Santiago-Valparaiso, mais on me le fait pas à moi, le coup de l’attrape touriste avec une unique compagnie qui relie directement les deux destinations. Santiago est la capitale et donc le centre de gravité de tous les transports, et il y a beaucoup de compagnies qui assurent la liaison, avec forcément des prix tirés vers le bas.
On prépare tranquillement nos bagages pour cette nouvelle transhumance, quand au détour d’une conversation je comprends que nos deux voisines de chambres vont elle aussi à Valparaiso, en liaison directe. Jeunes et naïves. Je demande poliment le prix de leur billet, sûr de mon avantage. Pardon? Vous avez dit combien? Quasiment moitié prix. J’évite le regard moqueur d’Emma, et la tête basse, je me rends à la station de bus et demande à tout hasard si nos billets sont échangeables. Aucun problème. On me rend même la différence en liquide, probablement pour me dédommager de l’humiliation.
DSCF4977

Les collines et les miradors

12 heures plus tard, affamés par l’absence de nourriture dans le bus (moitié prix, mais avec un service rudimentaire), on arrive donc à Valparaiso, et une fois le petit-déjeuner avalé on s’empresse vers l’ascension de notre première colline dans cette ville tout en relief, pour profiter du premier point de vue.
DSCF4959
On se perd en direction d’un “mirador” (j’aime bien les miradors) et on s’arrête quelques minutes pour vérifier le plan, quand on réalise qu’on est observé par plusieurs personnes autour de nous, avec cet air surpris si singulier de celui qui ne s’attendait pas à voir de touriste/gringo par ici. Le patron d’un petit bistro, probablement un repère mafieux, traverse la rue et nous informe dans un anglais étonnamment parfait qu’on se rend dans la mauvaise direction “it’s not safe for you that way, you should go in that direction”. Il nous remet donc dans le droit chemin, nous prévenant qu’en règle générale sur les collines de Valpo, plus on monte, moins c’est sûr. On restera donc sur les sentiers battus, déjà bien assez nombreux et photogéniques, empruntant les fameux ascenseurs (dont la vétusté ne rassure guère) vers les différentes collines.
Un ascensor de Valparaiso

Un ascensor de Valparaiso

On finit la journée par Viña del Mar, la cité balnéaire juxtaposée, pour un petit bain de soleil en compagnie des pélicans.
DSCF5014

Piscos et moon-walk

Technologies et facebook aidant, on découvre “par hasard” qu’un camarade étudiant rennais est lui aussi à Valpo, et on retrouve donc à leur auberge Julien (http://jiglobetrotter.overblog.com/) avec Typhanie (projet culinaire intéressant! http://pourlaptitehistoire.com/), autour de délicieux fajitas, on n’est pas non plus obligés de toujours manger chilien au Chili!
Jorge (rrolrré pour ceux qui savent rouler les R), le patron de l’auberge, offre des piscos sours, et un verre entraînant un autre, on se retrouve avec d’autres âmes perdues en quête d’un débit de boissons dans le quartier, quand Jorge rencontre des amis musiciens, les convainquant de nous organiser un petit concert improvisé. On dégèle donc très vite l’ambiance d’un minuscule troquet, réchauffé par la douce voix de la chanteuse du petit groupe, et on continue sur notre lancée, finissant inévitablement par danser le moon-walk jusqu’au lendemain matin, dans un club qualifié ici d’alternatif, en fait un club gay jouant exclusivement les tubes des années 90, parfait!
Autant dire que la productivité du lendemain en question n’était pas celle des grands jours, mais c’était mérité! On n’avait pas l’appareil, donc pas de photos pour illustrer ce paragraphe, et c’est probablement pas plus mal…

De Santiago à San Pedro

Finalement remis sur pied, on poursuit vers Santiago, capitale qu’on imagine agréable à vivre, quoique polluée à vous en cacher les Andes, mais “touristiquement” parlant dépourvue de grand intérêt (le principal musée qui nous intéressait étant fermé pour changement de collection).
DSCF5046
On achète nos billets de Bus vers l’étape suivante, San Pedro de Atacama (je me suis renseigné, c’est moins cher en liaison directe…)